Vacation Rental Investment Property: Expenses

Summer is here and vacations are in the air.  Perhaps, it is also time to think about how we can pay for our vacation with income from an investment property purchased to rent. As we discussed yesterday, if you receive income from renting property for use as a dwelling, such as a house or apartment, you may need to report the income, and you may be able to deduct certain expenses. 

To make your tax life easier and less confusing for you, your tax preparer, and the tax authorities, be clear about your goals for the rental property.  Are you using the property partly for your own use and renting it out when you aren’t using it or are you operating it solely for a profit?  If you are using the property yourself and renting it, divide the portions of expenses between your investment and your personal tax forms based on days used or percentage used, and you will not run into tax trouble.

Types of Rental Expenses

In most cases expenses related to renting your property are deductible. These deductions can be applied against the income you receive from rent to lower the amount of the rental income that is subject to tax. These would general be reported on a form 1040.  According to the IRS, if you use the investment property to rent for a profit and do not use the dwelling as a residence, or for personal use, then your deductible rental expense may add up to more than your gross rental income. When you use the property for both personal and rental use, you will not be able to deduct rental expenses in excess of the gross rental income minus the rental portion of the mortgage interest, real estate taxes, casualty losses from federally declared disasters for the rented part, realtor’s fees, and advertising costs.

Deductible expenses include:

  • Advertising
  • Auto and travel expenses (if the primary purpose of the trip is to collect rent or to manage, conserve, and maintain your rental property)
  • Cleaning and maintenance
  • Realtor and Online Commissions
  • Depreciation: This expense begins when the property is rented or placed in service. It is taken over the lifetime of the property to cover the cost of the original purchase.
  • Insurance
  • Interest on loans other than the mortgage
  • Legal and other professional fees
  • Local transportation expenses (those incurred collecting rents, managing, conserving, or maintaining your property)
  • Management fees
  • Mortgage interest paid to banks, etc.
  • Mortgage expenses, including mortgage commissions, abstract fees, recording fees, are not deducted as expenses, but are considered part of the basis of your property as capital expenses and are depreciated.
  • Points. Points are prepaid interest and are deducted over the life of the loan and not all in the year the loan was made.
  • Pre-rental expenses: Expenses incurred maintaining your property from the time you make it available to rent
  • Rental payments for equipment
  • Rental payments for the property you lease
  • Repairs
  • Taxes
  • Utilities

Vacant Property

You can deduct expenses incurred maintaining and preserving your property when it is vacant, or vacant while listed for sale.

Uncollected Rent – Not Deductible

Don’t deduct uncollected rents. It is not included in your income, so it cannot be deducted.

Renting to Your Employer

If you rent part of your home to your employer and provide services for your employer in that rented space, report the rental income.  Claim the income and deduct the expense for that portion of the house. You can deduct mortgage interest, real estate taxes, casualty losses from federally declared disasters for the rented part of your home.

I would like to help you with funding for an investment rental property or vacation rental.  I have a long-term rental loan program that can help you get into an income-producing vacation rental investment property.

Please give me a call when you find that perfect real estate investment and know how much money you need.

Patrick St.Cin
512-213-2271
Patrick@REICapital.cash 

References

IRS Publication 527 (2018) Residential Rental Property

IRS Tax topic 415 Renting Residential and Vacation Property

Image Credit, vacation rental, Seattle. Fred Ueckert, FJU Photography [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D

Vacation Rental Investment Property: Income

Summer is here and our heads are full of vacation plans. Some of us rent summer vacation homes to stay in and some of us rent vacation homes out to others for income.

As a real estate investor, you may be considering buying a property to rent out for income or to remodel and resell. There are four points about income taxes that apply to rental properties that you should know about.

1.  If you rent the dwelling for fewer than 15 days a year, you do not have to report any of the rental income and cannot deduct any expenses as rental expenses.

2. If you receive income from renting property for use as a dwelling, such as a house or apartment, you will most likely need to report the income, and you may be able to deduct certain expenses.

3. The accounting method you choose to follow determines when you count income and deduct expenses.

4. Whether you use the property personally for vacations with your family and friends makes a big difference.

Accounting Method:

The accounting method you use determines when you claim income and deductible expenses.

Types of Rental Income:

Monthly rent is only one kind of income you may receive.  You may also receive rent in advance. You report monthly rent when you receive it. A tenant may pay you to cancel a lease. This income you report when you receive it. A tenant may pay some the expenses attributed to the rental dwelling (for example utilities). You declare the expenses paid as income. You can then deduct the expense if they are deductible rental expenses. A tenant may pay you with services (for example painting) or property (for example they construct a built-in grill). In this case you report the fair market value of the service or property as rental income.

Security deposits are not included in your income if you intend to return them to your tenant at the end of the lease. But, if you keep part or all of the deposit, include it as rental income in the year you receive it.  If a security deposit is used as the final month’s rent, include it as advanced rental income when you receive it.

Personal Use

According to the IRS, If you use the property for personal use 10% of the time or 14 days a year (whichever is greater) and rent it out at the fair market value for income, limitations apply on the rental expenses you can deduct. You will need to divide the expenses between the personal use and the rental income use based on the number of days of each. Of course for personal use, you will not receive income so there is nothing to report on the personal taxes. When you use the property for both personal and rental use, you will not be able to deduct rental expenses in excess of the gross rental income minus the rental portion of the mortgage interest, reals estate taxes, casualty losses from federally declared disasters for the rented part, realtor’s fees, and advertising costs.

One thing to note about personal use is that if you rent to a relative or friend for a token amount, less than the fair market value of a dwelling just like yours, you have to count this use as personal use, not as investment rental income use.

I have a long-term rental loan program that can provide funds for your real estate investment for the purpose of renting for income.

REI Capital Resources is a direct lender as well as a broker of funding solutions. We offer short and long-term financing options.

Please give me a call when you find that perfect real estate investment and know how much money you need.

Patrick St.Cin
512-213-2271
Patrick@REICapital.cash 

References

IRS Publication 527 (2018) Residential Rental Property

IRS Tax topic 415 Renting Residential and Vacation Property

Vacation rental Image in Florida. Jan Lieberman [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D