Deferment Fog

Although real estate agents are seeing increases in inquiries about homes in the suburbs compared to the same period last year and house sales are up slightly in the second-home market, consumers are not applying for as many loans and banks are not lending as much.

Millions of Americans, 29 million, filed for unemployment last week for the first time according to Investopedia.com, slightly more people than expected, but less than the previous week.

As they lost their jobs or were forced to close their businesses, homeowners who could not make their mortgage payments asked their mortgage servicers for permission to pause their payments. Once a rare occurrence, the number of accounts in deferment, forbearance, or some other form of relief rose to 100 million between March 1 and the end of May according to today’s Wall Street Journal article by Anna Maria Andriotis.

For lenders and borrowers, these are difficult times because the coronavirus stimulus package includes a provision that says lenders that allow borrowers to defer their debt payments cannot report these payments as late to the credit reporting companies, making credit scores an unreliable marker of how a borrower is doing paying their loans back.

Banks are pulling back on credit because lenders are having a difficult time determining if applicants’ credit scores and credit reports reflect their true levels of risk. Not only do they not know who to lend to, but they cannot tell how much their loan losses will be if the economy remains a mess.

Across the board, lending standards have been tightened. Even mailed credit card solicitations fell from 316 million in February to 74 million in May. (Wsj.com)

It takes more work to find borrowers who will pay their loans back. A lender will have to sort through more data. Some lenders are asking borrowers for permission to look at their payment history on accounts not appearing in their credit report and to analyze their banking accounts.

If you need funding, apply now. I am working online with the rest of you.

Patrick St. Cin

W – 512-213-2271

M – 505-239-3026

Patrick@REICapital.cash

http://www.reicapital.cash/

References

Andriotis, June 29, 2020, Flying Blind Into a Credit Storm’: Widespread Deferrals Mean Banks Can’t Tell Who is Creditworthy, available online at https://www.wsj.com/articles/flying-blind-into-a-credit-storm-widespread-deferrals-mean-banks-cant-tell-whos-creditworthy-11593423001?mod=hp_lead_pos5

Fluctuating LTV

The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is the amount a borrower can borrow from a lender compared to the appraised value of the property that he or she wants to buy. The LTV determines the amount of a down payment a borrower has to supply from his own pocket to invest in the property.

Loan-to-Value ratio = Mortgage amount ∕Appraised value of the property.

For example, if the lender offers a loan at a 90% loan-to-value ratio, the borrower must supply 10% of the total cost of the purchase. In a fix-n-flip loan the same is true, the lender that supplies up to 90% (for example) of the home purchase price, requires the borrower to provide the other 10% of the price.

The Coronavirus pandemic has changed things rapidly including the market value of homes, thus affecting the LTV ratios lenders depend on. Please call for the most up-to-date loan-to-value ratios on our loans for your upcoming projects. 512-213-2271

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Default

If a borrower defaults on a home loan, which is more likely to happen if they do not have much of their own money in the home, the lender takes back the home and sells it to get back the money they lent. Market fluctuations can cause lenders to lose money if the value of a house goes down and the borrower defaults on the loan. The value of the home may be less the amount of the loan. The coronavirus pandemic may make home prices goes down, but that is not certain and may not be true in all locations.

Equity

If the borrower had equity in the home and defaults, then the borrower loses the equity they have in the home because the lender takes the property and sells it to recoup their investment and expenses as quickly as possible.

Equity is the amount of money that would be returned to homeowner if the asset is liquidated (sold) and all debts are paid off. It is in a home owner’s best interest to sell a home before they default on a loan and pay the loan off if possible both so they can get their equity out of the home and so that they can keep their credit history in good shape.

FICO Score Requirements

The FICO score required on loans relates to the buyer’s credit history. It reflects how often they have been late or defaulted on loans in the past. Before the coronavirus pandemic set our lives, marketplace, and economy into a spin, REI Capital Resources required a FICO score of 650 on a hard money loan with a term of up to 24 months. Many people have lost their jobs and their credit scores have suffered. Watching the unemployment rate go up, lenders across the country have tightened up their FICO requirements and these requirements are changing daily. Please call me for our latest FICO requirements. 512-213-2271.

Selling to Avoid Foreclosure

Owners in default or facing default will sometimes take less than the market value for a house to avoid foreclosure. They may settle for only getting part of their equity back, reasoning that some is better than none. None is what they will get if they go into foreclosure and the lender takes back the property and sells it for the balance owed on the loan. The borrower may even give up all their equity to sell the house before defaulting to keep their credit history intact and their FICO scores high.

Buying Opportunity

The distressed homeowner’s situation becomes the buyer’s opportunity. The homeowner needs help to retain their high FICO score and some equity, and the fix-n-flip buyer needs to purchase a property for the lowest price. It can be a win-win deal.

As a direct lender, it is my job to help you get a purchase and rehab loan as quickly and as easily as possible. The perfect fit is still out there. Call me though for the most up-to-date information.

I am working online with the rest of you. If you need funding, fill out the BLN application at   http://reicapital.blnsoftware.com/ or send me an e-mail or give me a call.

Patrick St.Cin

W – 512-213-2271

M – 505-239-3026

Patrick@REICapital.cash

www.REICapital.cash

Numbers: Prices, Percentages, Points

Despite the volatility of the stock markets and the Texas weather, no matter if it is raining, blowing, or baking, even if I have to walk uphill both coming and going, in a “snownado,” I am here to help you find ways to put your money and your time to good use making more money in big or small, short-term or long term, real estate investment adventures.

I have several loan programs to offer.

 

 

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Patrick@reicapital.cash

512-213-2271

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Boost for the Credit Score

News from Wall Street Journal reporter Anna Maria Andriotis this week tells us that the major credit reporting companies will soon be adding data from consumers’ utility and phone bill paying history to their credit reports. This is a move that she says will likely boost the credit scores of millions of people and increase traditional loan approvals. According to Andriotis, Experian will start factoring in this payment information early next year.

Consumers who have low or no scores because they have no history of borrowing and subprime borrowers whose scores are currently lower than what some lenders require will likely see their credit scores go up.

Some of these changes are coming about because of pressure the banks themselves have placed on the credit reporting industry and its regulators because they want to make more loans.

To make this work, people will have to opt into the new program and link the bank accounts they use to pay their phone and utility bills to Experian, allowing the company to track their monthly payments.

The credit score shows a borrower’s ability to responsibly use and pay off credit cards and loans, and in the future other types of bills.

The five factors that are most important in determining a credit score according to Thad Merrill are

an individual’s payment history,

the amount of outstanding balances,

length of credit history,

the types of accounts, and

the number of recent credit inquiries.

Factoring in utility and phone bill payment histories will help with at least the length of credit history.

If you are interested in borrowing for real estate investment, hard money lenders offer alternatives to those who have bad credit. They can also offer faster access to financing with less stringent eligibility requirements. However, investors may pay a higher interest rate over a shorter period. Hard money lenders are semi-institutional lenders who are not required to adhere to the policies and regulations that are required of banks. These requirements really tightened up after the 2008 financial crisis. If  traditional lenders are looking to lend more money, it might be because they think the good economy “still has room to run.”

Good economy or bad economy,  it is always a good idea to improve your credit score, particularly if you want to invest in real estate.  A good credit score opens up more financing options and will speed up the loan approval process, and you won’t miss out on that great deal.

Patrick@InvestorsLendingSource.com

512-213-2271

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Reference: Andriotis, AnnaMaria, WSJ December 18th, Want a Better Credit Score? Soon, Your Cellphone Bill Could Help.