Homeowners who are delinquent on their mortgage provide an opportunity for investors

Homeowners are delinquent on their mortgage provide an opportunity for investors!

There are still 1.5 million borrowers who are seriously delinquent or have late-stage delinquencies at 90 days or more past due on their home loans, according to the June Mortgage Monitor report from Black Knight.

While the national delinquency rate is at its lowest level since the beginning of the pandemic, about 1 million homeowners are expected to be in serious delinquency as September’s wave of mortgage forbearance program expirations begin, the report showed.

The economic recovery is expected to slow down even more as more Americans fall behind on their mortgage payments, and fewer can afford to purchase homes. The housing recovery will be delayed as banks tighten their lending standards. 

What is the difference between default and delinquency?

Delinquency means that you are behind on payments. Once you are delinquent for a certain period of time (usually nine months for federal loans), your lender will declare the loan to be in default. The entire loan balance will become due at that time.

How did we get here?

One of the most difficult things about owning a home is taking care of your financial obligations. If you’re not making your monthly mortgage payments, you’re considered delinquent. In the past decade, this has been a problem for a lot of homeowners. In total, about 1.5 million homeowners are delinquent on their mortgage payments. This is a problem for the investors, as the value of these homes goes down because the homeowners can’t afford to pay their mortgage. It’s a frustrating situation for everyone involved.

The 90–day delinquency rate is a measure of serious delinquencies. It captures borrowers that have missed three or more payments. This rate measures more severe economic distress. View this link to learn more and view interactive charts:  https://www.consumerfinance.gov/data-research/mortgage-performance-trends/mortgages-90-or-more-days-delinquent/

What you need to know as an investor

Per MarketWatch (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/one-subset-of-homeowners-could-be-in-trouble-here-are-the-real-estate-markets-most-at-risk-11625591292):

Any homeowner who isn’t able to sell their home or modify their loan is likely to face foreclosure or other financially challenging options, such as a short sale, the researchers warned. Whether a homeowner leaves their home by choice or through foreclosure at the end of all this, it will have the effect of adding supply to the market they live in.

“As a result, a buyer’s market could develop in ZIP Codes with heavy exposure to such borrowers,” the researchers wrote, noting that these would be areas with a high concentration of FHA loans in delinquency. So which markets are most at risk?

Atlanta tops the list, with 17.4% of the city’s mortgages in delinquency as of May. The city also has a large share of FHA loans overall, with those loans representing over a fifth of all mortgages in the city.

Many of the metro areas most threatened by such a scenario were located in Texas, including Houston (No. 2), Dallas (No. 4), San Antonio (No. 8) and Ft. Worth (No. 9).

Should you buy a distressed property now?

If you’re planning to buy a distressed property, now may be a good time to buy. Just make sure you’re aware of the risks and understand what you’re getting into.  Distressed homes offer a unique buying opportunity for real investors, but the average home buyer should probably look elsewhere. 

If you need funding, apply now. I am working online with the rest of you.  

Patrick St. Cin

W – 512-213-2271

Patrick@REICapitalResources.com

http://www.reicapital.cash/

Photo by Public Domain Pictures on Pexels.com

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